AdmissionsAcademicsStudent AffairsAlumniDiscover FordhamResourcesAthleticsLibraries
Photo Bar1 Photo Bar2
  • Theology
Search Fordham with Google  
Undergraduate Bulletin 2012-2014

Theology

Chair: T. Tilley
Associate Chair: Hornbeck (RH), Hogan (LC)
Locations:
RH: DU 151, (718) 817-3240, Fax: (718) 817-5787
LC: LL 924, (212) 636-6381, Fax: (212) 636-7153
Website: http://www.fordham.edu/theology

FACULTY

Distinguished Professor: Johnson
Karl Rahner Chair in Theology: (open)
James and Nancy Buckman Chair in Applied Christian Ethics: Hilkert Andolsen;
Avery Cardinal Dulles, S.J., Chair in Catholic Theology: T. Tilley
Professors: Fisher, B. Hinze, C. Firer Hinze, Lienhard, Nasuti, Papanikolaou, M. Tilley, Viladesau, Welborn
Associate Professors: Callaway, Demacopoulos, Dunning, Hill Fletcher, Hogan, Kubicki, Kueny, Lee, O'Connell, Scirghi
Assistant Professors: Camosy, Davis, Harkins, Hornbeck, B. Moore, O'Connell, C. Peppard, M. Peppard, Reklis, Seitz
Lecturer: Denniston
Professors Emeriti: Collopy, Dillon, Heaney, D. Moore, Pereira, Schaefer, Shelley

OVERVIEW

The discipline of theology explores the big questions: What does it mean to be human? How shall we live? What does it mean to believe in (or reject) the existence of God? Why are there so many religions? Christian theology tackles these questions by engaging a variety of disciplines, including history, philosophy and literary studies. It works critically and appreciatively to discover, interpret, and understand the evolving beliefs and practices of Christianity. In light of Fordham's Jesuit heritage and Catholic identity, the department focuses on the rich diversity within the Catholic tradition. Coursework emphasizes the mutual influence of faith and culture historically and in the present. New York City provides a valuable resource, especially for engaging in dialogue with other faith traditions of the world. Located in the poorest US congressional district (Fordham’s Bronx Campus) and bordering census tracts of both the highest and lowest income levels in Manhattan (at Lincoln Center), our locations in New York City invite faculty and students to repeatedly make the connections between the world's religious and moral teachings and the realities of social injustice.

Majoring in theology provides an excellent liberal arts education. Theology majors learn the crucial skills of thinking critically and analytically, writing persuasively, communicating effectively and working with others cooperatively. They learn how to interpret classic and contemporary texts, to understand ritual, to analyze and evaluate moral norms, and to explore patterns of authority in the tradition and in the cultures it inhabits. Electives allow students to shape the major in light of their own interests.

The department offers a variety of activities each semester, including guest speakers, a movie series, musical events, study trips, informal gatherings with faculty, retreats, and museum visits. All theology majors and minors are invited to attend regular seminars at which faculty and graduate students present their current work

The department also has a chapter of Theta Alpha Kappa, the national honor society for religious studies and theology.

CONTRIBUTION TO CORE
The study of theology at Fordham provides an intellectually sophisticated engagement with the Christian tradition. All freshmen in Fordham College and the Gabelli School of Business take THEO 1000-Faith and Critical Reasoning, which introduces students to the academic study of religion as well as the intellectual foundations of theological questions past and present. All sophomores/juniors take one core theology course numbered THEO 3000-3799 with the attribute "Sacred Texts & Traditions", which introduces students to the historical-critical study of the scriptures or the classical texts of one or more religious traditions. The theology department offers courses that fulfill American Pluralism, Global Studies, Eloquentia Perfecta 3, Interdisciplinary Capstone, and Values Seminar (Eloquentia Perfecta 4) requirements.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

THEOLOGY MAJOR
(HEGIS Code 1510) Program Code 06110

The major in theology is available at Fordham College at Rose Hill, Fordham College at Lincoln Center and Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies at Lincoln Center and Rose Hill.

Theology majors are members of the theological community formed by the department's faculty and graduate students. The theology major offers students foundational study in the disciplines of biblical studies, historical theology and systematic theology. The program requires 10 courses. It is structured so as to bring together two elements: a) Content: a consideration of traditional theological themes, such as God, Christ, Church, ethics and liturgy; and b) Method: various aspects of Christianity are approached through distinct methods, which may or may not be engaged in doing theology per se, but whose end results are relevant to theology. Building on the core curriculum and its tier system, the major in theology is likewise structured in several tiers.

Tier One: Course Requirements of All Majors
The first tier consists of the following four requirements: THEO 1000-Faith and Critical Reason; one Sacred Texts and Traditions course; and two courses from the three-course sequence THEO 3832–3834-Christian Thought and Practice.

Tier Two: Concentrations
The second tier consists of five courses, which allow students to concentrate in one of four fields; other fields may be added in the future. The rationale for these four fields is primarily methodological; each concentration fosters a distinct set of scholarly skills and centers around unique sets of questions. The course requirements for each concentration are as follows; where elective courses are indicated, students will choose elective courses from any of the offerings of the theology department.

Theological Studies
This concentration consists of systematics, ethics, liturgy and historical courses and fosters critical capacities for thinking about fundamental questions such as God, the human person, truth, and society, as well as questions about how to live. It requires two Sacred Texts and Traditions courses, chosen in such a way that between these two courses and the Sacred Texts and Traditions course required in the Core Curriculum, each major will take one course on the Old Testament, one on the New Testament, and one on the sacred texts of a non-Christian tradition; the third course in the three-course sequence THEO 3832–3834-Christian Thought and Practice not already taken in the first tier; and two electives.

Sacred Texts
This concentration centers primarily on the textual traditions of Christianity, but also allows space for the sacred scriptures of other traditions. This concentration trains its students in the methods of exegesis and scriptural interpretation. It requires two Sacred Texts and Traditions courses, chosen in such a way that between these two courses and the Sacred Texts and Traditions course required in the core curriculum, each major will take one course on the Old Testament, one on the New Testament, and one on the sacred texts of a non-Christian tradition; and three electives.

Faith and Culture
This concentration focuses on the dynamics of religious beliefs and practices as an area of human experience shared across time and cultures and seeks to develop a broader understanding of the phenomenon of religion as practiced by persons of various faiths. It requires THEO 3870-Religion as Human Experience; a course on the Old Testament or New Testament if not already taken in the first tier; a course on a major non-Christian religious tradition; and either two or three electives, such that the total number of courses a student takes in this concentration will be five.

American Catholicism
This concentration focuses on the theology, history, and practice of Roman Catholicism in the United States. It requires AMCS 3000–3001-Catholic Studies Seminar; a course chosen from the offerings of the theology department which focuses on American Catholicism; and two electives. Concentrators in American Catholicism take at least one course in either of the testaments of the Christian Bible, if not already taken in the first tier. If a student in this concentration took a non-biblical course in the first tier, the biblical course taken in this tier would count as an elective.

Tier Three: Capstone Seminar
The third tier consists of a capstone course to be taken by all majors, THEO-3860-Contemporary Conversations in Theology. This course crowns the requirements for the major by focusing on a common theological theme. The theme of the course and the works utilized will depend on the expertise of the instructor; it includes a 25-30 page final paper.

THEOLOGY SECONDARY MAJOR
The secondary major is available at Fordham College at Rose Hill, Fordham College at Lincoln Center, and Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies at Rose Hill and Lincoln Center.

The secondary major comprises eight courses: Faith and Critical Reason, one Sacred Texts and Traditions course, any two of the three "Christian Thought and Practice" courses described above in the first tier of the major, and four theology electives. Secondary majors are strongly encouraged, but not required, to take as an elective the capstone seminar described above in the third tier of the major

THEOLOGY MINOR
The minor in theology is available at Fordham College at Rose Hill, Fordham College at Lincoln Center, and Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies at Rose Hill and Lincoln Center.

The minor in theology allows students to focus on areas that complement their major. It consists of six courses: Faith and Critical Reason, one Sacred Texts and Traditions course, any one of the three "Christian Thought and Practice Courses" described above in the first tier of the major, and three theology electives. There is no requirement for a student minoring in theology to take the capstone seminar described above in the third tier of the major. Discretion for admitting minors to the seminar will rest jointly with a student’s advisor and the faculty member teaching the seminar.

EARLY ADMISSION TO MASTERS PROGRAM

The accelerated M.A. program in Theology allows Theology majors presently enrolled in Fordham College at Rose Hill and Fordham College at Lincoln Center to attain both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in Theology in five years. Graduate courses begin in the student’s senior year, providing her or him with advanced training and enriching the undergraduate experience. An additional year of study permits the student to complete all of the Theology Department’s requirements for the degree of Master of Arts. For further information, contact an Associate Chair.

PROGRAM ACTIVITIES

The department offers a variety of activities each semester, including guest speakers, a movie series, musical events, study trips, informal gatherings with faculty, retreats, and museum visits. All theology majors and minors are invited to attend the monthly faculty seminar at which faculty present their current work.

COURSES PLANNED FOR FALL 2012-SPRING 2014

Note: Following each course are codes for where the course has been taught. R stands for Fordham College at Rose Hill, L for Fordham College at Lincoln Center, ER for Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies at Rose Hill, EL for Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies at Lincoln Center and EW for Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies at Westchester.

THEO 1000-Faith & Critical Reasoning (R, L, ER, EL, EW)
THEO 1006-Sin and Salvation in Medieval Theology (R)
THEO 1999-Tutorial
THEO 2999-Tutorial
THEO 3100-Intro To Old Testament (R,L, EL)
THEO 3105 The Torah (L, EL)
THEO 3120-The Prophets (R, L)
THEO 3200-Intro To New Testament (R, L, El, Er, Ew)
THEO 3205-The Four Gospels (R)
THEO 3212-The Gospel Of John (R)
THEO 3220-The Parables Of Jesus (R)
THEO 3230-Life And Letters Of Paul (R,L)
THEO 3250-Jesus In History And Faith (L)
THEO 3255-The Jesus Of History (R)
THEO 3310-Early Christian Writings (R, L)
THEO 3314-St. Augustine Of Hippo (R)
THEO 3316-Byzantine Chistianity (R, L)
THEO 3320-Augustine, Aquinas & Luther (R)
THEO 3330-Medieval Theology Texts (R, L)
THEO 3360-Reformation Texts (R)
THEO 3375-American Religious Texts (L)
THEO 3390-Church In Controversy (R)
THEO 3542-Catholic Social Teaching (R, L)
THEO 3546-The Bible and Social Justice (R)
THEO 3610-Christ in World Cultures (R)
THEO 3620-Great Christian Hymns (R, L)
THEO 3700-Scriptures Of The World (R)
THEO 3711-Sacred Texts Of Mideast (R. L)
THEO 3713-Classic Jewish Texts (L)
THEO 3715-Classic Islamic Texts (R,L)
THEO 3720-Hindu Lit & Ethics (R, L)
THEO 3724-Classic Buddhist Texts (R,L)
THEO 3730-Sacred Books Of The East (R, L)
THEO 3800-Internship
THEO 3816-Christian Mystical Theology (R,L)
THEO 3822-The Bible in Western Culture (R)
THEO 3826-Women in the Bible (L)
THEO 3827- The Bible and Human Sexuality (L)
THEO 3832-Christian Thought and Practice I (R, L)
THEO 3833-Christian Thought and Practice II (R, L)
THEO 3834-Christian Thought and Practice III (R, L)
THEO 3835-Martyrs, Monks, Madmen (L)
THEO 3836-Cappadocian Theology (R)
THEO 3847-Latino/A Theology (R)
THEO 3848-Theologies Of Liberation (R)
THEO 3849-Eschatology (R)
THEO 3855-Environmental Ethics (L)
THEO 3857-Theologies of Sexuality and Gender (L)
THEO 3858-Gender and Asceticism (L)
THEO 3860-Contemporary Conversations in Theology (L, R)
THEO 3861-Works of Mercy, Work for Justice (R, L)
THEO 3863-Vocation of the Healthcare Provider (R)
THEO 3865-Ethics of Relationships (L)
THEO 3870-Religion as Human Experience (R,L)
THEO 3871-Religion and Film (R, L)
THEO 3876-Muslims in America
THEO 3877-Religion & The Amer Self (L)
THEO 3878-Religion and American Politics (L)
THEO 3880-Practical Theology (R)
THEO 3952-Ethics of Modern Selfhood (R)
THEO 3981-Catholic Studies Seminar I (R)
THEO 3982-Catholic Studies Seminar II (R)
THEO 3993-Wartime Religion In Us Hist (L)
THEO 3997-Catholic Studies Seminar (R)
THEO 3999-Service Learning - 3000 Level
THEO 4005-Women And Theology (R, L)
THEO 4008-Religion And Ecology (R)
THEO 4011-The Nt & Moral Choices (L)
THEO 4015-Values And Sexuality (R,L)
THEO 4020-A Faith That Imagines Justice (L)
THEO 4025-Marriage In 21st Century (R)
THEO 4030-Moral Aspects Of Medicine (R)
THEO 4035-Prof Responsibilities (R)
THEO 3455-Eucharist, Justice, Life (R)
THEO 4570-Orthodox Christian Ethics (R)
THEO 4600-Religion and Public Life (L)
THEO 4848 Human Nature after Darwin (L)
THEO 4849-God and Evils (R)
THEO 4999-Tutorial

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

THEO 1000 - FAITH & CRITICAL REASON (3 credits)

An introductory theology course designed to acquaint students with the analytical study of religion and religious experience, and to give them some critical categories of evaluating the history of theological discourse. The academic study of some of the forms, concepts, experience, and theological formulations found in Christianity and various other traditions will be introduced.

THEO 1004 - IGNATIAN THEOLOGY -21st CENTURY (3 credits)

Can religious faiths hold up under the pressure of critical reason in the 21st century? Do theological concepts have any relevance for people living in the 'real world'? By actively engaging in service to the Bronx community and investigating the work of Ignatius of Loyola and those who have followed him, this course will pursue these questions. We will trace the way Jesuit thinking offers a response through patterns of mission, theology, poetry and practice. Service hours required. Selected sections will be offered as Eloquentia Perfecta seminars.

THEO 1005 - MYSTICAL POLITICAL FAITH (3 credits)

In the modern period, religious faith has been either rejected as irrelevant or marginalized as a purely public affair. Students in this course will explore contemporary and historical example of faith as profound encounter with Absollute Mystery that is also the source of and hope for personal and social transformation.. Along with a variety of texts, special attention will be paid to the variety of mystical political expressions of faith present in NYC including houses of worship, agents and institutions dedicated to social change, works of art, cinema and theater.

THEO 1006 - SIN AND SALVATION IN MEDIEVAL THEOLOGY (3 credits)

This Manresa seminar will provide a survey of Christian understandings of sin and salvation in the medieval West, c. 400-1500. Theologians whose writings on these topics will be considered include Augustine, Anselm, Peter Lombard, Thomas-Aquinas, Bonavenhue, John Duns Scotus and Martin Luther.

THEO 3100 - INTRO TO OLD TESTAMENT (3 credits)

History, literature and religion of ancient Israel.

THEO 3105 - THE TORAH (3 credits)

Study of different types of literature found in the first five books of the Hebrew Bible and of the methods for its interpretation. This course will focus on the process by which this material moved from oral tradition to written literature to sacred scripture in Israel.

THEO 3120 - THE PROPHETS (3 credits)

A study of prophecy in the Bible from its origin in the religious practices of the ancient Near East to the final literary shape of biblical books. Moses, Elijah, Amos, Hosea, Jeremiah, Isaiah and Ezekiel are among the figures to be studied.

THEO 3200 - INTRO TO NEW TESTAMENT (3 credits)

Christianity began as a Jewish movement. Jesus' followers worshipped the God of Israel and ordered their lives according to the Torah and other sacred texts. As Christians separated themselves from the synagogue, they began composing texts proclaiming the Gospel. This course will engage questions about the origin, development and authority of the Christian canon while reading parts of the New Testament in the historical context of first-century Hellenistic Judaism and the religious context of the canon.

THEO 3205 - THE FOUR GOSPELS (3 credits)

The gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John as separate and distinct testimonies to Jesus. Their Jewish and Hellenistic backgrounds. The parables, Sermon on the Mount, and other teachings of Jesus. A reading of other, non-canonical gospels, such as the gospel of Thomas. The quest for the historical Jesus. Crucifixion and resurrection. Early Christologies.

THEO 3212 - GOSPEL OF JOHN (3 credits)

Literary and theological analysis of the fourth gospel; special attention to the theme of personal revelation in Jesus Christ, the motif of misunderstanding and the thematic unity of the gospel as a whole.

THEO 3220 - THE PARABLES OF JESUS (3 credits)

Through engagement with the parables in the Gospels, students will explore historical, theological, literary, and ethical methods of interpretation. Focused study of the socio-economic conditions of the first century will ecourage students to compare the parabler original meaning with their challenges for us today. Using the parables frequent emphasis on the poor and marginalized, students will be able to generate diverse options for serving local communities.

THEO 3230 - LIFE AND LETTERS OF PAUL (3 credits)

This course will study the Apostle Paul through a historical and literary critical analysis of his letters and his place in the development of early Christianity.

THEO 3250 - JESUS IN HISTORY AND FAITH (3 credits)

A study of the early Christian understanding of Jesus' life and ministry as this understanding is expressed in the Gospels, and of the so-called problem of the "historical Jesus" which issues from a critical reading of these texts. This course will cover several divergent readings of Gospel texts by contemporary scholars.

THEO 3255 - THE JESUS OF HISTORY (3 credits)

The history of gospel research is surveyed, from Reimarus to Conzelmann, in pursuit of the lessons learned as to the nature of the religion of Jesus and the limits of criticism.

THEO 3310 - EARLY CHRISTIAN WRITINGS (3 credits)

A selective study of the writing of prominent Christian theologians from Justin Martyr to Augustine, concentrating on early beliefs concerning God, Christ, the Church and the sacraments.

THEO 3314 - ST. AUGUSTINE OF HIPPO (3 credits)

A study of the life and thought of St. Augustine (354-431). Particular attention is given to his early philosophical writings, the Confessions, and his teaching on sin and grace. Students read Augustine's works in translation and write several short papers.

THEO 3316 - BYZANTINE CHRISTIANITY (3 credits)

Historical and critical study of classic authors and texts in the Orthodox tradition including: Basil of Caesarea, John Chrysostom, John Climacus, John of Damascus, and Gregory Palamas.

THEO 3320 - AUGUSTINE, AQUINAS & LUTHER (3 credits)

This course provides a historical introduction to the life and thought of three of the most significant and infuential theologians in the history of Christianity. The course will be divided into three units, one per theologian, and the general rubrics wilthin each unit will be "Faith and Reason" and "Nature and Grace."

THEO 3330 - MEDIEVAL THEOLOGY TEXTS (3 credits)

Historical and critical study of classic theological texts of Augustine, PseudoDionysius, Anselm, Bonaventure and Thomas Aquinas. Doctrine of God, the human person and Christ; relation of theology and philosophy.

THEO 3360 - REFORMATION TEXTS (3 credits)

This course will examine major Protestant and Catholic texts from the sixteenth century with attention to their religious, social and theological context and their importance for their respective ecclesial communities.

THEO 3375 - AMERICAN RELIGIOUS TEXTS (3 credits)

A critical and contextual reading of classical texts in American Religions History, focusing on diverse traditions and the crucial importance of religious perspectives to American culture, society, and self understanding.

THEO 3390 - CHURCH IN CONTROVERSY (3 credits)

A study of the Catholic Church's written responses to some of the major controversies and secular ideologies in the modern world. Some of these include the rationalism of the Enlightenment, 19th-century liberalism and nationalism, the varieties of socialism and various forms of 20th century totalitarianism.

THEO 3542 - CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to modern Catholic social teaching. Major papal and conciliar documents will be read and critically examined from various Christian and non-Christian perspectives. Their relation to contemporary social issues will be explored.

THEO 3546 - BIBLE AND SOCIAL JUSTICE (3 credits)

A study of social justice in the Hebrew and Christian scriptures that involves historical, literary, theological, and ethical interpretations. Students will explore key biblical texts that address themes such as poverty, war, justice, power, and marginalization in historical context, within a history of interpretation, and in light of contemporary practice and theory.

THEO 3610 - CHRIST IN WORLD CULTURES (3 credits)

At the center of the Christian tradition stands the person of Jesus Christ. Yetfrom a global perspective, Christianity takes many forms in its many contexts. This course examines the ways in which the Christian faith interacts with diverse world cultures and asks the central question, how do cultural differences shape contemporary interpretations of Jesus as the Christ?

THEO 3620 - GREAT CHRISTIAN HYMNS (3 credits)

This course will examine the poetry of Christian hymnody, beginning with the New Testament to the present, in order to unpack the rich and divergent theology expressed through its language and symbol, metaphor and doxology.

THEO 3700 - SCRIPTURES OF THE WORLD (3 credits)

An introduction to the inspired writings that have molded the religious life of humankind.

THEO 3711 - SACRED TEXTS OF THE MIDEAST (3 credits)

First, an introduction to selected sacred literature of Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Israel, with attention to the social and historical contexts of the writings. Then, a similar consideration of selected readings from the New Testament of Christianity and the Mishnah and Talmud of Judaism. Finally a study of the Qur'an, the rise of Islam, and some early Muslim writings.

THEO 3713 - CLASSIC JEWISH TEXTS (3 credits)

An exploration of Jewish beliefs through close readings of the Bible and post-Biblical Jewish texts (Mishnah, Talmud, midrash, liturgy). The course will focus on Jewish methods of biblical interpretation, legal discussion, and the relationships between texts, practice and theology in Jewish tradition.

THEO 3715 - CLASSIC ISLAMIC TEXTS (3 credits)

This course explores the sacred texts of Islam including the Quran, and Hadith, medieval philosophical, liturigical and legal texts.

THEO 3720 - HINDU LIT & ETHICS (3 credits)

This course involves a study of the four aims of life (purushartha) in Hinduism: kama (enjoyment), artha (material gain), dharma (sacred law), and moksha (liberation). Readings, drawn from a variety of classic and modern Hindu texts, will be viewed in their historical contexts as developments in the evolution of Hinduism.

THEO 3724 - CLASSIC BUDDHIST TEXTS (3 credits)

This course is an in-depth study of the Buddhist textual tradition starting with the early sectarian canon in South Asia and progressing through Chinese Buddhism to Japan, with a strong emphasis on Zen Buddhism. We will explore these religious texts in terms of their historical, cultural and artist contexts.

THEO 3816 - CHRISTIAN MYSTICAL THEOLOGY (4 credits)

Mystical Theology is the study of their experiences, and what they reveal about God, our world, and ourselves. Our course will begin with the roots of Christian spirituality in the Old Testament and the Greek philosophers, then trace its story through New Testament mysticism as embodied in Jesus and expressed by St John, St Paul, and the Apocalypse, the great spiritual writers of the First Church (Ignatius of Antioch and Irenaeus Lyons above all); the spirituality of the Greek Fathers (especially Gregory of Nyssa and Athanasius); the founders of medieval western mysticism (Dionysius the Aereopagite and Benedict pre-eminently), and then chronicle of mystical experience: the early Medievals; Anselm, Bernard and the New Orders; Francis, Bonaventure, adn the great 12th and 13th-century poets of Divine Love; Hildegarde and the German heritage; the great counter-Reformation mystics, especially Teresa and Juan de la Cruz; and the modern mystics, culminating in Simone Weil, T. S. Eliot, and Mother Theresa.

THEO 3822 - THE BIBLE IN WESTERN CULTURE (4 credits)

Study of selected biblical narratives that have troubled readers and affected culture through the ages. Topic include theories of reading, effects of history on biblical interpretation, art as exegesis, the hidden influences of past readings. Texts include the stories of Adam & Eve, the sacrifice of Isaac, David & Bathsheba, Jonah, Jeremiah. Interpretations are studied in historical sequence to provide students with a model for investigating a biblical text of their own choosing.

THEO 3826 - WOMEN IN THE BIBLE (4 credits)

In this course, we will employ various traditional exegetical and recent feminist tools to examine figures from both the New and Old Testaments including Eve, Sarah, Hagar, Ruth, Elizabeth and the Samaritan women as well as figures from the extra-Biblical Apocrypha.

THEO 3827 - THE BIBLE AND hUMAN SEXUALITY (4 credits)

This course examines key biblical texts that have figured in discussions of human sexuality from antiquity to the present. In particular, it will explore how shifting paradigms of interpretation in different historical periods have informed the reading of the Bible in relation to sexual ethics, identity, and practice.

THEO 3830 - CLASSIC CHRISTIAN TEXTS I (4 credits)

A selective study of the writings of prominent Christian theologians from the Church fathers through the Middle Ages focusing on early beliefs concerning God, the church and the sacraments.

THEO 3831 - CLASSIC CHRISTIAN TEXTS II (4 credits)

This course is a continuation of THEO 3830 and explores the central theological topics of Christianity as they develop in texts from the period extending from the Reformation to the present.

THEO 3832 - CHRISTIAN THOUGHT & PRACTICE I (4 credits)

Christian Thought and Practice I surveys the variety of Christian thought and practice from the beginning of Christianity to the late antique period. The course aims to encourage a critical examination of such theological themes as; God, Chris, grace, church, sacraments and ethics. Topics will be situated within the broader historical study of social, economic, political and cultural forces. Students will engage a wide range of Christian texts, art, rituals and other artifacts including classical theology, sermons and literature. Engagement with traditional Christianity by everyday Christian men and women, reflected in such genres as memoirs, ethnography and historical writing will be studied, as well as influential philosophical critiques of Christianity.

THEO 3833 - CHRISTIAN THOUGHT& PRACTICE II (4 credits)

Christian Thought and Practice II surveys the variety of Christian thought and practice from the late antique period through the middle ages. The course aims to encourage a critical examination of such theological themes as God, Christ, grace, church, sacraments, and ethics. Topics will be situated within the broader historical study of social, economic, political and cultural forces. Students will engage a wide range of Christian texts, art, rituals, and other artifacts including classical theology, sermons, and literature. Engagement with traditional Christianity by everyday Christian men and women, reflected in such genres as memoirs, ethnography and historical writing will be studied, as well as influential philosophical critiques of Christianity.

THEO 3834 - CHRISTIAN THOUGHT&PRACTICE III (4 credits)

Christian Thought and Practice III surveys the variety of Christian thought and practice from the Reformation to the present. The course aims to encourage a critical examination of such theological themes as God, Christ, grace, church, sacraments, and ethics. Topics will be situated within the broader historical study of social, economic, political, and cultural forces. Students will engage a wide range of Christian texts, art, rituals, and other artifacts including classical theology, sermons, and literature. Engagement with traditional Christianity by everyday Christian men and women, reflected in such genres as memoirs, ethnography and historical writing will be studied, as well as influential philosophical critiques of Christianity.

THEO 3836 - CAPPADOCIAN THEOLOGY (4 credits)

This course examines in detail the thought of the fourth-century Cappadocian Fathers (Basil the Great, Gregory Nazianzen, and Gregory of Nyssa). Themes include their development of the Orthodox doctrine of the Trinity and Christ as well as their attitudes toward Biblical exegesis, hagiography, and asceticism.

THEO 3837 - GOD AS TRINITY (4 credits)

This course will explore the reasons why Christians conceptualize God as Trinity.

THEO 3848 - THEOLOGIES OF LIBERATION (4 credits)

This course will explore the challenge of living Christian values in a global community marked by severe poverty, structural injustice and the threat of ecological devastation. The study of the values of Jesus, Catholic social teaching and various Christian theologies of liberation will inform the students' consciences on issues of economic justice, the distribution of wealthand power and the proper use of the earth's resources.

THEO 3849 - ESCHATOLOGY (4 credits)

An introduction to Christian eschatology with a biblical, historical, and contemporary component. Surveys biblical, apocalyptic, and New Testament teachings and developments in patristic, medieval, reformation, and modern Christianity.

THEO 3855 - ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (4 credits)

Since the early twentieth century, enduring moral and theological questions of human relationality and responsibility-previously only applied to individuals and human communities-have expanded to include the environment. In this class we will chart the genesis of environmental ethics from a historical point of view; identify and analyze significant claims and developments in environmental philosophy, ethics, and theology, especially vis-a-vis insights from ecology; and assess the importance of notions of value and justice in the first decades of the 21st century.

THEO 3857 - THEOLOGIES OF SEXUALITY & GENDER (4 credits)

This course examines Christian theologies of sexuality and gender, exploring both the historical roots and the contemporary implications of different ways of thinking theologically about what it means to be a sexed, gendered, and sexualized human being. A required service learning component will provide an opportunity for students to interrogate the complex structures (ecclesial/theological, political, economic and otherwise) that shape the experiences and possibilities of sexual minorities in an urban metropolis in the 21st century.

THEO 3858 - GENDER AND ASCETICISM (4 credits)

This course treats issues of sexuality and bodily discipline such as the distinction between gender and sex, images of male and female, monasticism, fasting, voluntary poverty. Most examples will be taken from the literature and practices of Late Antiquity (pre-Middle Ages).

THEO 3860 - CONTEMP CONVERSTNS IN THEO (4 credits)

Conceived as a “capstone” course for the theology major/minor, this course examines recent methodological developments in the disciples of theology and religious studies with particular emphasis on their intersection with contemporary critical theory. Particular topics to be engaged may include hermeneutics, historiography, secularism, the human subject, gender/sexuality, and the problem of political and/or moral action.

THEO 3861 - WORKS OF MERCY,WORK FOR JSTICE (4 credits)

This course examines the debates about the difficulties people have in making a living and about the practices of charity(works of mercy) and the justice advocacy of individuals, religious communities and voluntary associations.

THEO 3863 - VOCATION OF THE HEALTH CARE PROVIDER (4 credits)

This course examines the sociological and theological aspects of the health care profession. Specifically, this course explores some of the common ways in which individuals are called to the health care profession, as well as the experiences that both reinforce and provide challenges to their vocation. By the end of the course, students will have explored in some depth how structural components of health care, health care delivery systems, and their own personal sources of ultimate concern intersect to help shape understandings of health care as both a profession and a vocation.

THEO 3865 - ETHICS OF RELATIONSHIPS (4 credits)

The course examines how culture affects the relationships that constitute what it means to be human. Topics include human dignity and dating, the virtues of friendship, intimacy, and spirtuality, God and gender, justice/ charity and financial responsibility, sexual ethics, marriage and family.

THEO 3870 - RELIGION AS HUMAN EXPERIENCE (4 credits)

Religion as Human experience aims to foster a broad knowledge of religion as a dimension of human experience. Through a consideration of various types of religions experience in a variety of different cultural contexts, this course will also introduce students to a selection of thinkers who try to define, comprehend, or critique religion.

THEO 3871 - RELIGION & FILM (4 credits)

The study of faith and doubt portrayed in cinema. Students will view and analyze films that present struggles of the human spirit, the secular portrayal of the Christ-figure, the role of the secular "messiah" or hero in Western society, the conflict between religious and secular authority, and the dilemmas of moral choice.

THEO 3876 - MUSLIMS IN AMERICA (3 credits)

This course will examine the history and experience of Muslims in the United States from the time of the slave trade to the present day. Through a close analysis of both primary and secondary materials, students will explore the rich diversity of US Muslim communities and their multi-faceted contributions to the global umma and the formation of an "American Islam". Particular emphasis will be given to the impact of 9/11 and the "war on terror" on the representations, challenges, and the experience of Muslims in America.

THEO 3877 - RELIGION & THE AMER SELF (4 credits)

A course in historical theology that examines the role of religion in the formation of American social and political culture. The course will utilize various interpretive approaches to uncover how the 'American self' is both the most religious and the most secular in the industrialized West.

THEO 3878 - RELIGION & AMERICAN POLITICS (4 credits)

This interdisciplinary seminar explores the nexus of religion and American public life. After treating topics related to electoral politics (e.g. canidate religion, voter religion, "value voters," religious rhetoric), students will then engage a series of "hot topics" that encompass ( and often combine) both religious and political discourse. The goal is to provide students with two alternative, yet complementary methods of analyzing the intersection of religion and American politics- one from a political science perspective and one from a theological perspective.

THEO 3880 - PRACTICAL THEOLOGY (4 credits)

This course teaches ways of analyzing the practice of faith. It studies multiple models for what it means to link how people live with what they believe.

THEO 3993 - WARTIME RELIGION IN US HIST (4 credits)

This course explores American religion during the Civil War, World Wars I and II, the War in Vietnam, and the War in Iraq. The anxieties and passions of wartime open up dialogue on the "justice" of particular conflicts, but they also prompt reflection on more basic questions of human meaning, suffering, loss, and death, and the sources and boundaries of selfhood.

THEO 3994 - RELIGION & VIOLENCE (4 credits)

This course examines how religious symbols, sacred texts, rituals, rhetoric, and institutions can be appropriated for violent ends. Through an examination of primary religious texts, students will examine potential sources for violent religious ideologies such as monotheism, favored sons, purity codes, martyrdom, radical dichotomies between self and other, competition for shared sacred space, and messianic, eschatological, or apocalyptic drama. These paradigms will then be tested through several case studies, such as mass suicides at Jonestown, the troubles in Northern Ireland, the persecutions of the Falun Gong, the rise of the Taliban and al-Qaeda, and other movements in human history where violence was suffered or perpetrated under the guise of legitimate religious expression.

THEO 3995 - RELIGION & THE AMER SELF (4 credits)

A course in historical theology that examines the role of religion in the formation of American social and political culture. The course will utilize various interpretive approaches to uncover how the 'American self' is both the most religious and the most secular in the industrialized West.

THEO 3999 - TUTORIAL (1-3 credits)

In this student-initiated program, the student may earn one additional credit by connecting a service experience to a course with the approval of the professor and the service-learning director.

THEO 4000 - SENIOR THESIS COLLOQUIUM (4 credits)

This course is designed as a capstone to the Theology major. In it, students will conceive, research and write their Senior theses under the guidance of the colloquium director.

THEO 4005 - WOMEN AND THEOLOGY (4 credits)

An examination of feminist/womanist approaches to the mystery of God.

THEO 4008 - RELIGION AND ECOLOGY (4 credits)

A course to study the earth as a matter of ethical and religious concern. Starting with bibical texts and classical doctrines, students will analyze the resources of the Jewish/Christian traditions that value the natural world.

THEO 4011 - THE NEW TESTAMENT AND MORAL CHOICES (4 credits)

This course will examine the principles of Christian living that emerge in the testimonies of Jesus and Paul as recorded in the New Testament and explore the ways in which they might apply these principles critically and responsibly in moral discernment of some of today's most debated and troublesome alternatives.

THEO 4012 - MORAL CHOICES OF THE FIRST CHRISTIANS (4 credits)

An exploration of how the first Christians made choices in all areas of life, including birth, sex, death, business, legal matters and politics. The course seeks to alicit a "grammar" of early Christian morals.

THEO 4020 - FAITH THAT IMAGINES JUSTICE (4 credits)

Throughout the semester, we will explore a variety of reasons why "the arts" serve an increasingly important function in our contemporary culture where our ability to imagine and create "the good life" has become increasingly difficult given religious and cultural pluralism, isolated individualism, capitalist consumerism, and fragmenting tribalism. We will also examine the validity of the claim that religion/faith needs the arts and the arts needs religion/faith if either is to be authentic, relevant, vibrant, and socially efficacious.

THEO 4025 - MARRIAGE IN 21ST CENTURY (4 credits)

An ethical examination of Christian marriage.

THEO 4030 - MORAL ASPECTS OF MEDICINE (4 credits)

The course examines the role of faith in the moral issues raised by advancements in medical science. The course will survey issues such as reproductive technologies, the patient-physician relationship, euthanasia and physician suicide, health care reform, AIDS and the human genome project.

THEO 4035 - PROFESSIONAL ETHICS (4 credits)

Applies ethical concepts and theories from religious ethics to professional and organizational life. Special attention is given to professional and corporate social responsibilities.

THEO 4450 - LITURGICAL THEOLOGY (4 credits)

This course will study the Roman Catholic liturgy, its history and theology. We come to understand a culture in part by examining its rituals. Through the lens of, the liturgy-its scripture, symbols and sacraments- we get a closer look at the story of the church.

THEO 4455 - EUCHARIST, JUSTICE, LIFE (4 credits)

This course explores the intrinsic relationship between celebrating the liturgy, especially the eucharist, and living lives of justice, peace, and social responsibility. Such topics as world poverty, hunger, immigration, violence, global warming, and the care of the planet will be examined.

THEO 4570 - ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN ETHICS (4 credits)

This Course will explore the two-thousand year tradition or Orthodox Christian Ethics. Students will be asked to resolve modern moral dilemmas by reading ancient Orthodox texts and their modern commentators. As such, the purpose of the course is twofold: 1) to develop an understanding of Christian ethics within an Orthodox theological perspective; 2) to develop the ability to make ethical judgments and to reflect critically on those judgments on established Orthodox theological principles.

THEO 4600 - RELIGION AND PUBLIC LIFE (4 credits)

The course explores the role of religion in public life, focusing primarily on American democracy and its separation of church and state. The course will focus on religion's voice in public debate over issues such as health, poverty, and biomedical and economic issues, whether specifically religious arguments and language should have place in public discourse, and the role of discourse in a pluralistic society.

THEO 4848 - HUMAN NATURE AFTER DARWIN: THEOLOGICAL, POLITICAL AND SCIENTIFIC PERSPECTIVES (4 credits)

This course enters contemporary theological, political and scientific debates about how to conceptualize human nature after Darwin.  We read Epicurus, Lucretius, Augustine, Aquinas, Darwin and contemporary theologians, political theorists and scientists.

THEO 4849 - GOD AND EVILS (4 credits)

This course analyzes biblical, theological, and literary texts and evaluates the ways in which these texts understand how to characterize the various forms of evils in the world, account for God's allowing these evils in creation, and how humans can and should work to remedy those evils.

THEO 4999 - TUTORIAL (1-3 credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.


©2013 Fordham University
Rose Hill Campus Bronx, NY 10458 (718) 817-1000
Lincoln Center Campus New York, NY 10023 (212) 636-6000
Westchester Campus West Harrison, NY 10604